Benefits

The Stigma that Denies Vet Benefits

 

At the height of the Iraq war, the Army routinely fired hundreds of soldiers for having a personality disorder when they were more likely suffering from the traumatic stresses of war. The Army later acknowledged the error and cut the number of soldiers given the designation. Unlike PTSD, which the Army regards as a treatable mental disability caused by the acute stresses of war, the military designation of a personality disorder is considered a “pre-existing condition” that relieves the military of its duty to pay for the person’s health care or combat-related disability pay.

 There are an unknown number of troops that still unfairly bear the stigma of a personality disorder, making them ineligible for military health care and other benefits.

According to figures provided by the Army, the service discharged about a 1,000 soldiers a year from 2005 to 2007 for having a personality disorder.

Were you wrongly discharged? Are you carrying “the stigma” and unable to access your benefits?

Tell us your story!

Certifications, Licensing and Education easier for Connecticut Vets

 

 

The American Veterans Alliance highlights Governor Malloy’s announcement that he has signed an executive order streamlining the process for veterans of the looking to get occupational certifications and licenses, and simplifying the process for awarding college credit to veterans for military education.

According to Governor Malloy and reported on the StamfordPlus website, “Connecticut has nearly a quarter of a million military veterans residing in our state and another 9,000 residents currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. These are people with special training, skills, and education who, upon returning to civilian life, are ready, willing and more than qualified to enter our workforce,” Governor Malloy said. “We must make it as easy as possible for these accomplished men and women to apply their skills to the goals they seek to accomplish after having served in our military so admirably.”

For additional information on how the government of Connecticut is serving America’s military veterans, visit  veterans.ct.gov.

 

More Money for Vets to Retrain

Veterans VRAP VOW Program

 

If you are an unemployed veteran looking to increase or adapt your skills and training so you and re-enter the workforce, the Veteran’s Retraining Assistance Program (VRAP) may be for you. As a part of the administration’s efforts to decrease the number of unemployed veterans, the VRAP program enters its second year.

According to the Veterans Administration, as part of the Veterans Opportunity to Work (VOW) to Hire Heroes Act of 2011, qualifying Veterans can receive up to 12 months of education assistance equal to the current full-time Montgomery GI Bill – Active Duty rate, which increases to $1546 on October 1, 2012.

If you are unsure if you qualify or if you need help completing your application, be sure to contact the AVA.

There are several factors that qualify you for participation:

  1. The VRAP program covers 1 year (12 months) of re-training.
  2. You must be unemployed as of the date of your application.
  3. You must have received an other than dishonorable discharge from service.
  4. You cannot be eligible for any other VA educational benefit program (for example,  the Post-9/11 GI Bill, Montgomery GI Bill, Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Assistance).
  5. You are currently not receiving VA compensation for unemployability.
  6. You are not enrolled in another state or federal job training program.
  7. You must be between the ages of 35-60.

If you want to apply but are unsure if you qualify, contact us and let us help you. If the VRAP program doesn’t work for you, we may be able to direct you to other options.

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Have you applied? Are you currently in training? Share your stories and comments!